APOLOGETICS: What Should We Think About Quantum Mechanics And The Laws Of Logic?

Photo courtesy of Unsplash

Right off, let me be clear that I am a journalist, not a philosopher or scientist, so the following discussion is that of an interested layman who makes no claims of special insight.

That said, I often hear in discussions with atheists and agnostics that Quantum Mechanics (QM) renders much of the conventional wisdom about the physical universe obsolete.

As an example, Kenneth Samples of Reasons To Believe, who is both a philosopher and theologian, considers the argument that QM specifically renders the Law of Non-Contradiction (LNC) old news.

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How A Young British Astronomer Proved Albert Einstein’s Theory Of Relativity

Yes, today is Memorial Day, but it’s also just two days short of the 100th anniversary of the proving of what has been termed the greatest scientific achievement by a single individual in the history of mankind.

Most famous equation in human history? Photo courtesy of Freerange.

That was when British Astronomer Arthur Eddington and two teams dispatched by the “Joint Permanent Eclipse Committee of the Royal Society and the Royal Astronomical Society of Britain to observe and record photographically the full solar eclipse scheduled to take place on May 29, 1919,” according to Professor of Political Science Emeritus Salim Mansur, writing today on American Thinker.

“At the time under Portuguese rule, Principe was selected as one of the two sites – the other was Sobral in the Brazilian Nordeste – from where the total solar eclipse and its full effect could be best observed. The expedition was proposed by Eddington, a rising star among British astronomers, to test Einstein’s general theory of relativity published in the middle of the Great War.”

All sorts of things happened — not the least of which was inclement weather — that could have left the mission a failure. But Eddington was able to overcome the obstacles and completed the photographic work required to test Einstein’s theory.

It’s a fascinating and significant story and one I suspect you will thoroughly enjoy reading on this holiday Monday.

Why Self-Assembling SmartPhones Are Coming And What They May Teach Us About … Well, Us

This could be a little difficult for some folks (me included) to wrap your mind around but imagine that your next Apple iPhone or Samsung Galaxy assembled itself, with no human or robot hands involved in the final process.

Self-assembling machines still require a brain to design them.
Photo courtesy Freerange.

No, that’s not science fiction speculation, but real-world technological progress. Super intelligent people at places like MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab are already working on turning the concept into reality and have come up with a pilot process, according to a smart guy who should know.

I don’t know about you, but I find that prospect absolutely fascinating because, if a self-assembly process is possible for a smartphone, the same cannot be far behind for … cars, computers, power plants, who knows what the limits might be or if there even are any limits.

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This May Be The Single Most VIP Fact On Which Christians And Atheists Agree

Black and white, cats and dogs, Christians and atheists. These pairs are just about as opposite as it is possible to be. But there is one fact that is so basic, so essential to logic and clear-thinking, that Christians and atheists agree on it.

Twister, Master of the Tapscott household

(As for the other two pairs, our black Lab Twister definitely prefers his color and the company of other canines to that of, you know, those arrogant, self-absorbed furrballs.)

NBC “Dateline” cold-case detective J. Warner Wallace — author of the highly recommended “Cold Case Christianity” — explains what that most basic fact is while responding to a probing question from a college student about how to explain the existence of a god:

This ‘Dime’s Worth’ Truly Makes All The Difference Between A Human Existence And Extinction

Sometimes the biggest variances result from the smallest details, even life or death, creation or destruction

You’ve probably heard somebody dismissively say something along the lines of “that doesn’t make a dime’s worth of difference to anybody or anything.”

Astrophysicist Dr. Hugh Ross of Reasons to Believe.

And after all, a dime is worth only 10 cents. Or is it?

What if the weight of one single dime (created from nothing) was added to the universe? Guess what, it’s so finely adjusted to sustain life on this planet (and, who knows, maybe others as well) that such a dime would … what?

It would literally make all the difference in the world for you and I. Astrophysicist Dr. Hugh Ross explains why:

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Are The Only Truths Those That Sense And Science ‘Verify’?

Some famous figure whose name escapes me at the moment once remarked on how many people go through life as slaves of long-dead philosophers, an observation that likely applies to all of us at one time or another.

But if you consider the only truth to be those claims that are detected via the five senses and which can be verified scientifically, you might want to become familiar with an 18th Century philosopher of the Scottish Enlightenment, David Hume.

Dr. Frank Turek, the noted Christian apologist and co-author of “I Don’t Have Enough Faith To Be An Atheist,” explains why in this brief video that gets right to the point:

 

Think Legislative Language Is Complicated? Check Out ‘Irreducible Complexity’ And Flagellum Motors

Biochemist Michael Behe introduced the concept of “irreducible complexity” with his 1996 book, “Darwin’s Black Box,” which made the case for the idea that there exists at the cellular level “a single system composed of several well-matched, interacting parts that contribute to the basic function, wherein the removal of any one of the parts causes the system to effectively cease functioning.”

To put it more simply, irreducible complexity means there are things like the Flagellum motor that consists of multiple parts that must all come together simultaneously if it is to perform its intended function. Assemble it sequentially and it doesn’t work. Yes, that’s an argument for intelligent design.

Before you close your mind and move on, you might want to take a little more than three minutes to watch this amazing video from the aptly named Discovery Institute.