SCIENCE AND FAITH: Why Is There Something Rather Than Nothing?

Photo by Yeshi Kangrang on Unsplash

What is the most basic question of all? How about “why is there something rather than nothing?” That’s even more basic than “why am I here” or “what is the purpose of my life?”

Philosopher Gottfried Leibniz (1646-1716) was a German polymath (i.e. extraordinarily smart person) and logician who said the most fundamental question of all was precisely that, why is there something rather than nothing.

His conclusion was that the answer to the question brings us face-to-face with the absolute necessity for the existence of God. Otherwise, nothing else, including us, would exist. It’s what philosophers and theologians today refer to as “The Contingency Argument.”

The following video from reasonablefaith.org provides an entertaining and thoughtfully accessible explanation of the how and why:


 

The Flaw That Isn’t In The Paley Argument That A Watch Requires A Watchmaker To Be Created

Watches don’t just magically appear out of nothing or assemble themselves without any outside assistance, therefore there must be a watchmaker doing what scientists and philosophers today call “intelligence design.”

Photo by Agê Barros on Unsplash

The preceding paragraph is a modern restatement of William Paley’s Watchmaker argument for the existence of God. Just as the watch requires a watchmaker, the universe requires a creator.

Critics today argue there is a fundamental flaw in Paley’s argument. Biochemist Fazale Rana explains on Reasons to Believe: Continue reading “The Flaw That Isn’t In The Paley Argument That A Watch Requires A Watchmaker To Be Created”

THINK ABOUT THIS: The Problem Of What Happens To Those Who Have Never Heard Of Jesus

It’s not a new problem, this question about all the people on earth and down through the centuries since Jesus — before He was crucified dead, buried and then resurrected on the third day — told everybody who would listen that He is the only way to eternal salvation.

A man who received a tract in the market near Hananeel Baptist Church sits down to read about Jesus.

Well, what about all those millions of men and women who never got the word about Jesus? How many millions of people died before the Christian church began sending missionaries carrying the Gospel of Jesus Christ around the world?

There have been a variety of possible answers to this problem. Some have argued that such people didn’t hear about Jesus because God chose for them not to hear about Him. This video from Reasonable Faith offers another take:


Are You Following HillFaith? Think Of What You Are Missing!


 

MYTH-BUSTERS: No, Christians And Muslims Do Not Worship The Same God

Philosophy Professor William Lane Craig

It’s a truism in much of today’s ecumenical efforts that Christians worship the same deity that Muslims do because both are monotheistic, that is, they each contend there is one god, not many.

The reality is that there are profound differences between the essential concepts of God held by orthodox Christians and the two major branches of Muslim belief.

Philosopher William Lane Craig contends the Muslim concept of god is “morally defective” and explains why in this video by first describing the Christian concept:

“As the greatest conceivable being, a morally perfect being, God must be all-loving. And this is exactly what the Bible teaches. The Bible teaches that God loves sinners, His love is impartial, it is universal, it is unconditional,” Craig says.

“And this is a world of difference from the god of the Quaran. According to the Quaran, god does not love sinners. God in the Quaran only loves those who first love him,” Craig continues.

“So that his love rises no higher than the sort of love that Jesus said tax collectors and sinners exhibit. They love those that love them,” he said. “The Quaran says god does not love the very people that John 3:16 says that God love so much that He sent His only son to die for them.”


 

THINK ABOUT THIS: Who And What Did Jesus Say He Was?

He’s the most famous person who ever lived, so all kinds of people have expressed opinions through the centuries since His death and resurrection about who Jesus Christ was, ranging from “great teacher” and “unique moral leader,” to “deluded fanatic,” “Jewish Messiah,” and “religious ascetic.”

Jesus triumphantly entering Jerusalem (Screen shot from Reasonable Faith video)

But who did Jesus think and claim He was? When He entered Jerusalem a few days before His crucifixion, the crowd spread palm branches before Him, a sign of their expectation that He would liberate them from Roman domination and oppression.

But they were mistaken, as were so many others since then and even today.  The far more important question is who did Jesus say and think He was? The following video produced by Reasonable Faith is an impressive, enjoyable presentation of the answers: