Yes, God Can Even Use Pink Floyd To Bring You To Truth

Rock legend Pink Floyd probably isn’t the first name that would come to mind if you were to ask 100 randomly selected professing Christians working on Capitol Hill or anywhere else who led them to accept Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior.

The Poached Egg founder Greg West isn’t just anybody, however, and here he explains the role of one of the cuts on the band’s classic album, The Dark Side of the Moon, played in his journey from atheist to one of this generation’s most significant Christian apologists.

But before you click on the “here” link above, watch and listen to the cut below and see if you can detect what it was in the lyrics that launched West on an epic spiritual journey. Yes, there is a hint in the above photo, which is by George Fitzmaurice on Unsplash:

How Could ‘Illiterate’ Disciples Write Jesus’ Gospels In Greek?

Among the most common objections to the credibility and historical reliability of the Gospels — the first four books of the New Testament, authored, respectively, by Matthew, Mark, Luke and John — is how could such men write in Greek if they were illiterate?

That objection is frequently accompanied by the claim that 90 percent of the people in the ancient world were illiterate. Several of the disciples who first proclaimed Jesus’ resurrection were viewed by Jewish leaders as “uneducated and untrained,” according to Acts 4:13. Compared to members of the Sanhedrin, the disciples likely weren’t as educated, but that’s not the same thing as being illiterate.

And both Matthew, a former tax collector, and Luke, a physician, certainly weren’t illiterate. Biblical scholars have long noted that Mark’s Greek is simple and direct, which suggests a lower level of education but clearly not illiteracy.

As for John, his Gospel is the most philosophical, which, since he outlived the other disciples, likely reflects that he thought long and hard before putting pen to scroll.

Cross-examined.org’s Dr. Frank Turek responds to this and related objections regularly, as seen in the following video in which he specifically addresses the critique of New Testament scholar and skeptic Bart Ehrman of the University of North Carolina.

Can Christians Be Faithful AND Work With Integrity On ‘The Hill?’

Christians everywhere face the question of whether their faith has anything to do with their jobs, but it’s an especially acute issue for those on a congressional payroll.

Here’s why: The law in America is made through the competitive political process, but culture is upstream from politics and faith in turn is upstream from culture. Your faith shapes your work ethos.

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New Evidence Shows Luke Didn’t Just Invent The Census In The Christmas Story

Christmas is less than a month away and that means there is a fair amount of discussion in the media and popular culture about the birth of Jesus Christ in a manger in Bethlehem.

Critics have long delighted to point out that the census that plays a key role in Luke’s Gospel account of His birth never really happened. Here’s how Luke put it:

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Here’s Why Even Critical Scholars Now Say The Gospels Are Reliable

One of the effects of working on Capitol Hill for any length of time is how it tends to capture your focus within the narrow confines of Washington politics and policy.

There’s a whole world out there in the “real world” beyond the Potomac River, one small but immensely significant part of which is the community of scholars who study things like whether the New Testament are reliable records of ancient history, especially the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Now, here’s what is likely a shocker for a lot of folks who spend their working lives toiling away in Congress: Beginning in the early 1970s and continuing today, scholars who once declared the New Testament was not reliable have now come to the conclusion that the Gospels are indeed authoritative and trustworthy.

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Wasn’t The Resurrection Really Just A Conspiracy?

“Conspiracy” is a word one hears regularly on Capitol Hill and it’s almost always in the context of somebody doing something they don’t want somebody else to know about.

After all, as Scripture says, darkness hates the light.

So there is invariably a sinister association with conspiracies, as well as with other words that can mean the same thing, including “plot,” “scheme” and “collusion.” The true purpose behind of any of these can actually be good or bad, but they are usually thought of as representing criminal or otherwise unpleasant purposes.

Which brings us to Jesus. People in high places and low have for millennia tried to dismiss the claim that Jesus was resurrected on the third day after his death on the cross as representing nothing more than a conspiracy among His disciples to fool the world to protect their own hides.

Cross-Examined’s Dr. Frank Turek often hears the claim, as he was recently by a Maryland college student. His response makes it clear that nobody needs a subpoena to get to the truth about the Resurrection:

Does The Bible Demean Women (On The Hill Or Anywhere Else)?

It’s a truism in many secular precincts that Christianity has kept women in a subordinate position to men, but is that a reflection on the Bible that defines the faith or on the Christians who misused or misunderstood it?

With at least 100 newly elected women heading to mount the Capitol Hill steps above as a result of the 2018 midterm election, according to Kathryn Watson of CBS News, the treatment and status of women in America is certain to be a huge issue in the new Congress come January. (Photo above by Louis Velazquez on Unsplash)

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