$15-An-Hour Minimum Wage May Be Coming For Hill Interns

At $31,200 annually, the new rate would make the first experience working for Congress much more affordable

Forty House Democrats are sponsoring Rep. Adam Smith’s reintroduced House Intern Pay Act that would require a $15-an-hour minimum wage for the young employees.

Rep. Adam Smith of Washington state.

“Paid internships help to bring a diversity of ideas and backgrounds to both the Washington, D.C. and local district offices, and expand equality of opportunity for all to participate in our democracy,” Smith said in a statement Tuesday.

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Will You Help Me Double HillFaith’s Followers? It’s Easy, Just Ask One Person To Join You Here

Taking the Good News to the ends of the Earth includes sharing the Gospel with people working for Congress

God has already blessed HillFaith in countless ways that I never expected and one of most important of them is the number of readers like you who have chosen to follow this humble blog.

Clicking on the Follow link in the right-hand column of the homepage is all a person has to do in order to receive an alert whenever a new post appears on HillFaith. If you haven’t also followed HillFaith on its Facebook page, you can do so by going here.

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I’m ‘Only’ An Intern … On Life In The Trenches On Capitol Hill

Here are some smart suggestions for making the most of that first post working for Congress

By Bret Bernhardt

In the overall scheme of things on Capitol Hill, interns, and junior staffers for that matter, seem to be a relatively inconsequential part of the process. However, in my experience, it is quite the opposite.

The Farmers Insurance commercial on TV says “we know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two.” That would pretty much describe my experience of 30 years working on Capitol Hill. This is particularly true about working with interns.

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There’s More To Keeping Talent On The Hill Than Pay

Pay is low on the Hill but there’s more to the issue of whether to stay or go.

By Bret Bernhardt

This may sound like an esoteric and idyllic response to retaining good talent on Capitol Hill, because that is what it is. But all worthy efforts start with big ideas and lofty aspirations.

So is the remedy for what ails congressional talent retention.  

In all the important decisions we make in life, including those of aspiring Hill staffers, we consciously or unconsciously keep two factors in mind:

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Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Committee Staff, Courtesy of R Street Institute’s Casey Burgat

There are basically two classes of congressional aides — those who work for individual senators and representatives make up one while those known as committee staff are the other.

Casey Burgat is a senior fellow of the R Street Institute, which does a bang-up job of tracking Hill staffing trends. He recently completed a comprehensive look at where things stand on committee staffing that should be of interest to anybody hoping now or in the future to occupy such a position. What did Casey find? Continue reading “Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Committee Staff, Courtesy of R Street Institute’s Casey Burgat”

Why Are Christians So Afraid Of Subjective Moral Reasoning?

There are no moral absolutes, it’s all relative, and whatever “works for you is fine for you but what works for me is something completely different” may be as close as contemporary culture gets to what it regards as a “truth” that always and everywhere applies.

Christian apologist Ravi Zacharias was asked the question posed in the headline above and it’s one of particular relevance to men and women working on Capitol Hill. Do not miss Zacharias’ opening response to his questioner.

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Five Biggest Staff Problems That Hurt Congress and America

One of the first things done by Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi after taking control of the big gavel was to appoint the Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress to recommend measures to bring the First Branch into the 21st Century of organizational management.

In its first hearing, the modernization committee heard testimony from 30 members representing both sides of the aisle, including Rep. Kathleen Clarke (D-Mass.) who provided a concise assessment of worrisome staffing trends:

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