Have You Heard About The New ‘Consent Condom?’

One thing can be said for sure about capitalism and that is where there is a demand for a consumer product, there will be a producer to satisfy that demand if a profit can be made.  Thus, the new “Consent Condom” from Argentinian firm, Tulipan.

What is the Consent Condom? Glad you asked, particularly if you work on Capitol Hill. Put a bunch of smart young adults in a pressurized, highly competitive workplace and “things” inevitably happen. Now the name of the product makes sense, doesn’t it.

Continue reading “Have You Heard About The New ‘Consent Condom?’”

PUEBLA 2019: There Was A Time You Couldn’t Pay Me To Do This

It wasn’t that long ago that no amount of money would have been enough to get me to do what I will do for the fourth time in five years, starting early tomorrow morning, February 2.

Me and more than a dozen buddies from Friendship Baptist Church in Sykesville, Md., and thereabouts will board a United Airlines flight from Dulles International Airport to Houston. It’s the first leg of a trip that takes us to Puebla, Mexico, arriving late tomorrow evening.

Why are we going there?

Continue reading “PUEBLA 2019: There Was A Time You Couldn’t Pay Me To Do This”

How To Deal With What Or Who You Fear Most On The Hill. Or Anywhere Else, For That Matter

If you’ve worked for any length of time on Capitol Hill, odds are you’ve run up against something or somebody that makes you feel uncomfortable, inferior, “dumber,” insecure, or maybe even fearful.

Don’t worry, we’ve all been there and you are not even remotely alone in having such feelings, whether you are a disciple of Jesus Christ or not. Believers are just as susceptible as anybody else, but they have two unique resources for dealing with such challenges.

Continue reading “How To Deal With What Or Who You Fear Most On The Hill. Or Anywhere Else, For That Matter”

Does Christian Hypocrisy Prove Christianity Is False?

Perhaps you’ve heard it before: “Christians are just a bunch of hypocrites!” Or maybe this version: “Christianity can’t be true because so many Christians are fakes.”

It’s a popular claim, one that has led many people to close their minds to even considering the growing mountains of credible evidence for the reality of the empty tomb of Jesus and His Resurrection.

The issue has special significance for men and women working at all levels on the Hill because of the high value placed on authenticity and shame attached to hypocrisy. Continue reading “Does Christian Hypocrisy Prove Christianity Is False?”

Big Challenges For Christians In Pew’s Latest ‘Nones’ Survey Results

“Religious Nones” are among the fastest growing groups whenever survey research organizations like the Pew Research Center do polls concerning religious issues.

The results of the latest Pew survey of a representative sample of the Nones – which includes those who identify themselves as “atheist,” “agnostic” and “nothing” – finds an important reason (60 percent) these folks give for their views is they “question a lot of religious teachings.”

Continue reading “Big Challenges For Christians In Pew’s Latest ‘Nones’ Survey Results”

Can Christians Be Faithful AND Work With Integrity On ‘The Hill?’

Christians everywhere face the question of whether their faith has anything to do with their jobs, but it’s an especially acute issue for those on a congressional payroll.

Here’s why: The law in America is made through the competitive political process, but culture is upstream from politics and faith in turn is upstream from culture. Your faith shapes your work ethos.

Continue reading “Can Christians Be Faithful AND Work With Integrity On ‘The Hill?’”

Which Are More Reliable, Aristotle and Plato, or Matthew, Mark, Luke And John?

One of the most frequently mentioned myths about the Gospels (the first four books of the New Testament, written by Matthew, Mark, Luke and John) is the claim they cannot be historically accurate because they were written decades after the events they purport to report.

Several of the commenters to yesterday’s post here — “Are Christians The Biggest Fools Of All Time?” — repeated variations of the claim the Gospels are unreliable because so much time elapsed between the events and the writing of the individual books. The actual facts, the critics argue, were lost to the myths and legends that grew up around the events related in the Gospels.

The German higher critics of the 19th Century made this claim a standard argument in the conventional wisdom scholarship of the 20th century among those who reject the literal resurrection of Jesus Christ and His claim to be the incarnate creator of the universe and everything in it. And the argument continues in popular culture and debate to this day, as seen in the comments to yesterday’s post.

There has been a tremendous amount of scholarship on the accuracy and reliability of the Gospels in recent decades. Below is a link to a recent podcast of Frank Turek’s interview with Dr. Craig Blomberg, who is one of the most respected scholars in the world on this issue. I highly commend it to anybody on any side of the debate.

But more immediately, let’s address the question posed in the headline above. Nobody today doubts when they read Plato’s “Republic” or Aristotle’s “Nicomachean Ethics” that they are reading what the Greek philosophers actually wrote, even though what they hold in their hands are copies of copies of copies … stretching back centuries.

Even so, when was the last time you heard anybody say Plato’s discussion of the shadows on the wall of the cave cannot be trusted as what Plato actually wrote or believed because so much time elapsed between his original manuscript and the earliest copies used by copyists in the millennia before Mr. Gutenberg invented the printing press? Or that Aristotle’s Golden Mean as the key to human virtue was a creation of a later copyist and thus was not the philosopher’s original view?

Nevertheless, that’s a commonly expressed argument whenever the Gospels are under discussion.

But guess what? There are far more copies of the Gospels, written much closer to the original authors, than there are for any other of the ancient classics, including Plato and Aristotle.

Aristotle’s works were written between 386 B.C. and 322 B.C. The first copies came along in about 1,100 A.D., or roughly 1,400 years after Aristotle did his thing. As for Plato, he wrote between 427 B.C. and 347 B.C, and the first copies date to 900 A.D., for an interval of roughly 1,200 years.

Compare that to the New Testament, which, regarding the Gospels, the critics claim were written, at the earliest, around 70 A.D., with copies first appearing around 130 A.D.

In other words, if the same standards of reliability and accuracy are applied to the New Testament that have long been accepted without question for other ancient authors, then the Gospels must be viewed as among the most reliable of the ancient classics. You can check out this post by Matt Slick of Christian Apologetics and Research for more specifics on this angle.

And as I always say, a great place to start in assessing these issues is “More Than A Carpenter” by Josh and Sean McDowell. Just tell me your address and I’ll get a copy of MTAC for free.

Now, here’s Frank Turek’s extended audio conversation with Dr. Craig Blomberg:

https://crossexamined.org/?powerpress_embed=72550-podcast&powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio