THINK ABOUT THIS: Jesus Can’t Be The Only Way To Heaven Because All World Religions Are The Same

One of the most frequently heard objections to Christianity is that Jesus claimed to be the only way to Heaven, as He did at John 14:1 when He said: “I am the way, the truth and the life. No man comes to the Father but through me.”

But exclusive claims like that just grate on many Americans’ democratic sensibilities. Thus, the counter-claim that all of the world’s major religions make the same basic claims has great appeal.

But that appeal doesn’t change the fact of what Jesus said about Himself. In the following video, produced by philosopher William Lane Craig’s Reasonable Faith organization, the competing claims of the world’s religions are compared and contrasted, and in the process, the uniqueness of Jesus becomes crystal clear:


 

Christians Are Just A Bunch Of Gullible Bible Thumpers, Right?

Cold-Case Christianity’s J. Warner Wallaces Responds to a great question during a recent conversation on the campus of Ohio State University

That question posed in the headline above is a commonplace criticism one often hears in the media, on campus, and in a wide range of public forums in America.

You saw a typical example of this sort of ad hominem on Sunday if you happen to have watched “Meet The Press” when NBC’s Chuck Todd read a letter-to-the-editor of the Lexington (Ky.) Herald claiming people who believe Noah’s Ark actually existed are typically Trump supporters.

But this isn’t a new argument, as J. Warner Wallace explains during a recent presentation at Ohio State University. In the process, he addresses these key questions: “Why do Christian believe in – and expect – an afterlife? Is our belief in Heaven and Hell based purely on the teaching of the Bible? Is there any other good reason to expect a life beyond the grave?”


Here’s What To Expect On HillFaith In 2020!

THINK ABOUT THIS: Can Science Alone Explain Morality?

Every human being who ever walked the face of the Earth has an innate sense that some acts are “good” and others are “bad.” Every known human society has had a moral code that defines what is good and bad.

But from where does that sense of right and wrong come? Are people born with it, or is it acquired over a period of time in which environmental, genetic and other factors combine to produce moral concepts?

Biola University Professor Sean McDowell takes up this question in the following video, including the familiar claim that the existence of moral judgements by humans can be entirely explained by science. Advocates of the latter view, he points out, commit the category fallacy in logic:

THINK ABOUT THIS: How To Know When The Cumulative Evidence Is Overwhelming

There are times when, no matter what the evidence shows, the conclusion to which it points is, for whatever reason, so difficult to wrap our minds around, or so contrary to what we have long believed,  that we simply refuse to accept it.

Screen shot from “One-Minute Apologist.”

That description undoubtedly fits a lot of folks working on Capitol Hill when the issue at hand is whether or not God exists. Probably no other issue in life is more subject to rationalization, avoidance and intellectual blinders.

When there are multiple factors pointing to a common causal conclusion, that’s significant but not necessarily decisive. When there are multiple factors from multiple categories of evidence that point to a common causal conclusion, that’s decisive.

J. Warner Wallace, NBC “Dateline” Cold-Case Detective, explains why in this video with “One-Minute Apologist Bobby Conway:

THINK ABOUT THIS: Is God Really Dead? A Conversation Well Worth An Hour Of Your Saturday

John Lennox is the famous and brilliant Oxford mathematician and Christian apologist. David Rubin is the famous and brilliant web radio host and child of a conservative Jewish home.

What on earth might two guys of such different backgrounds have to talk about for an hour? Well, what could be more important than the question that has been center stage in Western culture ever since Nietzsche declared that “God is dead.”

This is an hour-long conversation, but I hope you will get yourself a cup of java, sit down somewhere quiet and give this delightful, stimulating and instructive conversation between two really smart, funny and honest guys your attention on this first Saturday of December 2019.

Continue reading “THINK ABOUT THIS: Is God Really Dead? A Conversation Well Worth An Hour Of Your Saturday”

The Claim Of ‘Moral Relativism’ Is Actually A Cultural Myth With Vast Influence

There’s no such thing as moral absolutes. As long as you don’t hurt anybody else, whatever seems right to you is just fine. Everybody knows that, so do it! That’s the absolute truth.

See Acts 18:3 for the description of Paul as a tent-maker to support his missionary work. (Photo by KAL VISUALS on Unsplash)

Well no, it’s not and among the best evidence that it’s not is the fact hardly anybody lives by that maxim, according to Drew Covert of the Tent-Making Christianity blog. But lots of folks profess to believe it, especially when presented with the Gospel of Jesus Christ and their need for Him as their savior.

When you read Covert’s post, don’t miss Professor J. P. Moreland’s story about the student who got an F on an essay on moral relativism because it was written in blue ink. Go here.

Here’s The ‘Chicken-And-Egg’ Dilemma That Confronts Atheists

Is it really possible to explain the origin of life from non-life without God? Lord knows, smart people like Stephen Hawking and legions of others who deny or ignore the possibility of God as creator have been trying for centuries.

But they face what NBC “Dateline” Cold-Case Detective J. Warner Wallace calls the “Chicken-And-Egg” dilemma regarding the proteins that are the essential building blocks of life. It appears to be unsolvable without God. Continue reading “Here’s The ‘Chicken-And-Egg’ Dilemma That Confronts Atheists”