Big Challenges For Christians In Pew’s Latest ‘Nones’ Survey Results

“Religious Nones” are among the fastest growing groups whenever survey research organizations like the Pew Research Center do polls concerning religious issues.

The results of the latest Pew survey of a representative sample of the Nones – which includes those who identify themselves as “atheist,” “agnostic” and “nothing” – finds an important reason (60 percent) these folks give for their views is they “question a lot of religious teachings.”

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Working On The Hill: Seems Like Just Yesterday But It Was 1977

Check it out. My first job on Capitol Hill was as press secretary for Rep. Robert Bauman (R-MD), who represented the Eastern Shore of Maryland, working from 118 Cannon HOB.

Odds are, this shot was snapped as I was on the telephone talking to Don Baker of the Washington Post Metro Section staff, who covered Bauman during my nearly two-year tenure there. He remains to this day one of the journalists for whom I have the most respect.

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Alisa Childers’ Rescue Boat For Hill Aides Adrift In a Sea Of Doubt

There are hundreds of men and women working in Congress who came to town a year ago or maybe a few years ago professing to be followers of the Lord Jesus Christ, but then the realities of life on Capitol Hill hit them square in the face.

Challenges to their faith — intellectual and otherwise — are everywhere on the Hill and doubts can become a huge problem. Some choose to leave their faith behind, others retreat into spiritual ghettos.

Photo by Mishal Ibrahim on Unsplash

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Can Christians Be Faithful AND Work With Integrity On ‘The Hill?’

Christians everywhere face the question of whether their faith has anything to do with their jobs, but it’s an especially acute issue for those on a congressional payroll.

Here’s why: The law in America is made through the competitive political process, but culture is upstream from politics and faith in turn is upstream from culture. Your faith shapes your work ethos.

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Should A Congressional Aide View ‘Forensic Faith’ As An Oxymoron?

People on Capitol Hill often speak of the importance of doing a “forensic audit” of a government program, a corporate expenditure or a political campaign, typically in conjunction with a court case or a congressional investigation.

The purpose of a forensic audit is to uncover facts that would otherwise likely go undiscovered, which could in turn render the case or investigation inadequate or outright wrong. Can there be such a thing as a “forensic faith?”

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Here’s Why Even Critical Scholars Now Say The Gospels Are Reliable

One of the effects of working on Capitol Hill for any length of time is how it tends to capture your focus within the narrow confines of Washington politics and policy.

There’s a whole world out there in the “real world” beyond the Potomac River, one small but immensely significant part of which is the community of scholars who study things like whether the New Testament are reliable records of ancient history, especially the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Now, here’s what is likely a shocker for a lot of folks who spend their working lives toiling away in Congress: Beginning in the early 1970s and continuing today, scholars who once declared the New Testament was not reliable have now come to the conclusion that the Gospels are indeed authoritative and trustworthy.

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Maybe Those Gospel Contradictions Are Intentional

Mention “New Testament” or “Bible” or “Gospels” in a mixed crowd and be prepared to be told there are so many contradictions in the documents that they can’t be believed.

As Prof. Sean McDowell points out, there are indeed what appear contradictions in the Gospels, such as John 3:16 and I John 2:15. “Which is it? Are we supposed to love the world, as God does, or not,” McDowell asks.

“Yet closer analysis reveals they are not thoughtless mistakes from a careless writer, but part of an intentional rhetorical strategy to get readers to reflect upon the deeper meaning of words,” McDowell continues.

If you work on the Hill, such a rhetorical approach might not seem so foreign. After all, liberals and conservatives use the same words all the time, but infuse them with different, sometimes radically different, meanings.

McDowell goes on to illustrate his point with additional examples. Definitely worth your time to read and consider.

Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash