Remember! Jesus Is The Reason For The Season

Here’s wishing you and yours a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. I’ll be back January 2, 2020.

THINK ABOUT THIS: Can Science Alone Explain Morality?

Every human being who ever walked the face of the Earth has an innate sense that some acts are “good” and others are “bad.” Every known human society has had a moral code that defines what is good and bad.

But from where does that sense of right and wrong come? Are people born with it, or is it acquired over a period of time in which environmental, genetic and other factors combine to produce moral concepts?

Biola University Professor Sean McDowell takes up this question in the following video, including the familiar claim that the existence of moral judgements by humans can be entirely explained by science. Advocates of the latter view, he points out, commit the category fallacy in logic:

WORKING ON CAPITOL HILL: Should I Stay Or Should I Go?

By Bret Bernhardt

No doubt this question has bounced around in the minds of nearly everyone who has worked on Capitol Hill, especially in the holidays, which is a time to reflect and take stock heading into a new year.

Bret Bernhardt, former chief of staff for senators Don Nickles and Jim DeMint.

The long hours, relatively low pay, and frustrations that accompany working on the Hill all contribute to this season of evaluating whether or not to move on.

Something else that might factor into the question of whether or not to move on from the Hill is that most staffers are transplants from somewhere else. Continue reading “WORKING ON CAPITOL HILL: Should I Stay Or Should I Go?”

WHAT DO YOU THINK? Why Does God Sometimes Seem So Hidden?

Have you ever experienced a tough time in your life when things just never seemed to go right, your friends and family were of no help, and even when you sought Him in prayer, God seemed not to care what happened to you? I have and odds are you will as well at some point, if you haven’t already.

King David experienced the same thing, but much more intensely, so intensely in fact, that he recorded it in Psalms 143:7: “Answer me quickly Lord; my spirit fails. Don’t hide your face from me, or I will be like those who go down to the pit.”

There is another Psalm that isn’t attributed to David, but which sounds very much like him. Psalm 102:1-3 puts it this way: “Lord, hear my prayer; let my cry for help come before You. Do not hide Your face from me in my day of trouble. Listen closely to me; answer me quickly when I call.”

Professor Sean McDowell of Biola University offers a challenging and encouraging explanation in this video for why God sometimes seems like He doesn’t care:

THINK ABOUT THIS: How To Know When The Cumulative Evidence Is Overwhelming

There are times when, no matter what the evidence shows, the conclusion to which it points is, for whatever reason, so difficult to wrap our minds around, or so contrary to what we have long believed,  that we simply refuse to accept it.

Screen shot from “One-Minute Apologist.”

That description undoubtedly fits a lot of folks working on Capitol Hill when the issue at hand is whether or not God exists. Probably no other issue in life is more subject to rationalization, avoidance and intellectual blinders.

When there are multiple factors pointing to a common causal conclusion, that’s significant but not necessarily decisive. When there are multiple factors from multiple categories of evidence that point to a common causal conclusion, that’s decisive.

J. Warner Wallace, NBC “Dateline” Cold-Case Detective, explains why in this video with “One-Minute Apologist Bobby Conway:

How A Mint-Green Blazer Turned An Invisible Hill Aide Into A National Celebrity

There’s a maxim from the 60s that says “everybody gets 15 minutes of fame” and maybe that explains why Russell Dye made the Style pages of The New York Times earlier this week.

Screen shot from NYT.

Whatever the reason, the reality is Dye, a Republican communications aide to Rep. Jim Jordan on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, wore a striking mint-green blazer and bow tie during one of the impeachment hearings and people noticed.

Dye is not alone, as another Jordan committee aide, Charli Huddleston, was seen on a stairway above a group of protesting Republican House members. The light was just right and it made her appear to either about to be beamed back to the USS Enterprise or taken up into heaven ala the prophet Elijah.

And don’t ask Janae Frazier, press secretary for Rep. Mark Walker (R-NC) about that pizza incident that made Twitter and then a bunch of other places, too! “I was like, ‘WHAT? All this for being hungry?’” Frazier told the Times Katherine Rosman.

Rosman also talked to several former Hill aides who shared some revealing stories about themselves and their experiences working in Congress.

You can read Rosman’s excellent story on these Hill aides who suddenly and unexpectedly found themselves in the spotlight by clicking here. Enjoy!

STAFF MOVES: Look Who Is Getting Promoted On The Hill

Recent Staff Moves, As Reported By Legistorm:

There’s a new deputy chief of staff for Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-Ark.) and the name is Jefferson Deming. Deming is moving up from the legislative director slot in the same office. He’s a 2012 Vanderbilt University graduate in political science and government.

Jefferson Deming (Screen shot from his Facebook page).

As the accompanying photo from his Facebook page shows, Deming is seriously into moving up. Be nice to him, too, because he lists among his former jobs being a summer roustabout on an off-shore drilling rig. That’s no job for the faint-hearted!

Heather Sager (Screen shot from her Facebook page).

Heather Sager is the new communications director for Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-Ill.). Heather got her law degree in 2010 from the University of Indiana School of Law and her BA in philosophy and international studies from Saint John’s University in 2007. This is her first Hill position, so welcome, Heather!

Continue reading “STAFF MOVES: Look Who Is Getting Promoted On The Hill”