HILL STAFF MOVES: Look Who’s Getting Promoted

Recent Moves, As Reported By Legistorm:

Garrett Exner’s newest assignment is as military legislative assistant to Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas). Exner is a 2019 MA graduate of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. This is Exner’s first Capitol Hill job.

Danny Jativa is Rep. Vicky Hartzler’s new communications director. Danny comes to Hartzler from a stint as a reporter at the Washington Examiner. Before that, he worked for Florida Republicans Daniel Webster and John Mica. He just finished an MA in governance at American University and earned his BS at Florida State University in international relations.

Ron Deutsch has signed on with Rep. Nanette Diaz Barragán (D-Calif.) as communications director. This is Ron’s first job on the Hill. It appears from his Facebook page that Ron’s closest friends’ nickname for him is “Pinky.”

Doug E. Davis is the new chief of staff managing things for Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Miss.). A former Mississippi state senator, Davis should have little trouble adjusting to the Hill, as he was previously a senior adviser to the Mississippi solon. He is a 2000 graduate of Mississippi College.

Lots going on in the office of Rep. Ben Cline (R-Va.) with Matt Hanrahan moving from legislative assistant to communications director and Beth Kaczmarek going from scheduler to office manager. Matt is a 2016 political science and government graduate from Catholic University, as is Beth, in 2009.

Good News On Hill Salaries?

Good news about pay? Maybe. It depends on what happens now that the Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress has in hand a report from the American Political Science Association Taskforce Subcommittee on Staffing Diversity and Retention.

Photo by Jp Valery on Unsplash.

The report observes this on the issue of compensation:

“The top reason given by congressional staff for why they depart Congress is low pay. For several decades, Congress has offered stagnant and uncompetitive salaries to its aides, particularly when compared with compensation levels for equivalent positions in the private sector.

“The effects of such low wages are compounded given that D.C.-based congressional aides live in one of the most expensive metropolitan areas in the country and are increasingly likely to come to Congress owing large amounts in student loans.

“As a result, Congress has struggled to retain qualified and effective staff. Staffers regularly depart Congress after short tenures, trading their congressional experience and connections for higher salaries offered by special interest and lobbying organizations.

“To combat this revolving door and to increase retention among its aides, we recommend that Congress increase salaries paid congressional staffers.”

None of that, of course, is news to anybody who has worked on the Hill since Jimmy Carter occupied the Oval Office, but perhaps highlighting the situation via the subcommittee’s report will produce some positive results.

Go here to read the full report, courtesy of legbranch.org.

Looking for a Hill Job?

Check out this five-part HillFaith series by Bret Bernhardt, former chief of staff for Senators Don Nickle (R-Okla.) and Jim DeMint (R-S.C.). Bernhardt has a wealth of experience, insider insight, how-tos and obscure terms (know what a “golden reference” is on the Hill?), plus lots of helpful links.

The Best Resources for Finding a Job On the Hill

Where Your Best Job Lead is on Capitol Hill May Surprise You

Getting in the Door on Capitol Hill

Here’s Nine Valuable Tips for Interviewing Well on Capitol Hill

Working on Capitol Hill is the World’s Best Job (Or at Least My Best Ever)

Author: Mark Tapscott

Follower of Christ, devoted husband of Claudia, doting father and grandfather, conservative lover of liberty, journalist and First Amendment fanatic, former Hill and Reagan aide, vintage Formula Ford racer, Okie by birth/Texan by blood/proud of both, resident of Maryland. Go here: https://hillfaith.blog/about-hillfaith-2/

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