How A Young British Astronomer Proved Albert Einstein’s Theory Of Relativity

Yes, today is Memorial Day, but it’s also just two days short of the 100th anniversary of the proving of what has been termed the greatest scientific achievement by a single individual in the history of mankind.

Most famous equation in human history? Photo courtesy of Freerange.

That was when British Astronomer Arthur Eddington and two teams dispatched by the “Joint Permanent Eclipse Committee of the Royal Society and the Royal Astronomical Society of Britain to observe and record photographically the full solar eclipse scheduled to take place on May 29, 1919,” according to Professor of Political Science Emeritus Salim Mansur, writing today on American Thinker.

“At the time under Portuguese rule, Principe was selected as one of the two sites – the other was Sobral in the Brazilian Nordeste – from where the total solar eclipse and its full effect could be best observed. The expedition was proposed by Eddington, a rising star among British astronomers, to test Einstein’s general theory of relativity published in the middle of the Great War.”

All sorts of things happened — not the least of which was inclement weather — that could have left the mission a failure. But Eddington was able to overcome the obstacles and completed the photographic work required to test Einstein’s theory.

It’s a fascinating and significant story and one I suspect you will thoroughly enjoy reading on this holiday Monday.

Author: Mark Tapscott

Follower of Christ, devoted husband of Claudia, doting father and grandfather, conservative lover of liberty, journalist and First Amendment fanatic, former Hill and Reagan aide, vintage Formula Ford racer, Okie by birth/Texan by blood/proud of both, resident of Maryland.